Pray for Priests This Ember Day

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

 
Remember that this week contains the Fall Ember Days.

Catholics have forgotten this ancient and venerable tradition! Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday - mark your calendars! Up until the late 1960s, Catholics between the ages of 21-59 were bound to the Laws of Fast on these days; those who have reached their 7th year or older were bound by the law of abstinence.

The Ember Days were instituted for a good harvest and to draw down God’s blessings upon the September ordinations. Pray for priests! Join in this ancient fasting, abstinence, and prayer tradition beginning today on Wednesday and then again this upcoming Friday and Saturday as penance.

Learn more in the Ember & Rogation Day Manual

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Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary in NJ Seeks to Expand

Monday, September 18, 2017

Within the walls of the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary in Summit, New Jersey, rows of simple crosses mark the graves of sisters who have gone before. It’s a potent symbol of life in the monastery, where women enter cloistered life intending never to leave, even in death.

These Dominican nuns have been in this place of peace for almost 100 years, sustaining the Church every day through their prayer and devotion. And while many religious orders are facing an aging religious population and steady decline, these sisters have seen the opposite trend.

In the past 10 years, 12 new women have entered the life, seven have stayed, and a steady stream of new young women visits to discern whether or not this is the life for them.

Continue Reading on Our Sunday Visitor

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Profession of Dom Ildephonse on the Feast of the Holy Cross

From the Simple Profession of Dom Ildephonse on the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, yesterday:




+ My Son, in the Introit of today’s Mass our holy mother the Church sings: “It behooves us to glory in the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ: in whom is our salvation, life, and resurrection: by whom we are saved and delivered.” There are many words written and spoken about the monastic life, but few are more apt, more poignant, than these words given us by the Church’s Sacred Liturgy today. For a monk is a man who, in dying to himself and to the ways of the world, truly embraces the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, and who finds in that embrace salvation, life and resurrection.

One year ago today, on this blessed feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross you were clothed in the habit of a novice. And now, today, after a year of testing, a year of bearing patiently with the limitations and exigencies of our small monastic foundation—and yet, also, a year of fidelity to the life of prayer and work which is to be found in any monastery, great or small, that is worthy of the name—you come vow yourself to this life for three years. You are doing a foolish thing. There are so many other things you could be doing. And yet, as has become clear throughout your time of testing, you can do no other thing than this today, for it is to this monastic obedience that Almighty God calls you.

The Gradual of today’s Mass mediates on the reality that “Christ became obedient for us unto death: even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath exalted Him, and hath given a Name which is above every name.” Once again the words of the Sacred Liturgy sing most eloquently of the monastic vocation: obedience unto death is the path to exaltation in heavenly glory! Our Lord himself suffered terribly. Your monastic life will certainly know times of difficulty and may even, as the twenty-first century unfolds, bring you suffering and persecution the likes of which we hope have been consigned to history. My Son, no matter how dark the shadows of the Cross that fall upon you may be, know that they are always cast by the light of Easter morning. Hold fast to our Lord’s teaching that “He who perseveres to the end will be saved” (Matthew 24:13).

In the holy perseverance that is your vocation you are not alone. As the formula of your vows makes clear, you will live your monastic life in a monastery, with the fraternal love of your brethren. You will live it in the communion of the whole Church, in union with our Bishop and with the local Church of Fréjus-Toulon. You will call upon the saints—particularly those saints whose relics are kept here—to assist you. And you have the support of family and friends who are here with us today, of the good people of this beautiful village of La Garde-Freinet who are so kind and generous to us, and of many others besides who have sent pledges of Masses and prayers being offered for your intentions today.

Today the Church blesses you and solemnly prays for your faithful perseverance in the vows you are about to make. But today is not about you, my son. Today is about God: it is an eloquent testimony to what Almighty God can do with and for each and every one of us—whatever our particular vocation may be—if only we are prepared to deny ourselves, take up the burden of the Cross and follow Christ without reserve: to Calvary, certainly, but with the even greater certainty of unending life beyond.

To that end you—indeed, we all—can do no better than make the words of the Collect of this Mass our prayer:

“Grant, we beseech Thee, that we, who on earth, acknowledge the mystery of redemption wrought upon [the Holy Cross], may be found worthy to enjoy the rewards of that same redemption in heaven.”



Source: Facebook

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Solemn High Mass for 10 New Carmelite Nuns in Philadelphia

Wednesday, August 09, 2017

Philadelphia’s Carmelite Monastery of St. Joseph and St. Anne, at 66th Avenue and Old York Road, celebrated the 115th anniversary of its foundation with a Solemn High Mass on the evening of Wednesday, July 26. 
The Carmel, which was established by nuns from the Boston Carmel and originally located at 18th and Poplar Streets then at 44th and Spruce Streets, has been at its current monastery since 1910, according to the Prioress, who in keeping with the Carmelite charism does not wish to be named. 
The nuns themselves were an unseen presence at the Mass because of their rules of strict enclosure. They only receive visitors from behind a screen. 
... 
The Mass was celebrated in the monastery’s beautiful chapel which was designed by Maginnis and Walsh, the Boston architects that later designed the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington. The celebrant was the monastery’s new chaplain, Father Scott W. Allen, F.S.S.P. (Fraternal Society of St. Peter). 
The Mass itself was in Latin in the Extraordinary Form using the 1962 Missal. It was unlike the typical Ordinary Form Masses that are usually celebrated in a vernacular language using modern translations of the Scripture readings. 
The Latin at the Extraordinary Form Mass was straight from the fourth century Vulgate Bible of St. Jerome, with a pamphlet that provided English translations taken from the Douay-Rheims Bible was compiled from 1582 to 1610. 
... 
Wherever they come from, they are welcome to this quiet gem of prayer in Philadelphia where day after day, year after year this small band of religious women live out the hidden life, all for the greater honor and glory of God.
Read more at Catholic Philly

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Life In Hidden Light: A Video Inside a Cloistered Convent

Saturday, August 05, 2017


Video of life inside an enclosed Carmelite community, including short excerpts of interviews with some of the Sisters. The Discalced Carmelites of Wolverhampton, UK, would like to thank Miranda Tasker and Marcus Nield, who made this film, for their hard work and professional skill. With only basic equipment, they did the filming and put together the presentation with sensitivity and understanding.

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Solemn Profession of Fr. Martin Bernhard

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Surrounded by family, friends and his monastic brothers, Fr. Martin’s resounding “Volo” ("I do desire"), in answer to the several ritual questions within the ceremony, publicly announced his commitment to remain a monk of Norcia until his death.

What does he desire? Stability in Norcia. Poverty. Obedience and chastity. Conversion of his life. To renounce "the pomps of the world.” This last phrase evocatively refers to all those things in the world that might take us away from God. May this be true for Fr. Martin and all Christians.

Source: Norcia Newsletter

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Five Deacons Ordained in Zaitzkofen in June 2017

Thursday, July 06, 2017

Please keep these deacons in your prayers
On Saturday, June 3, 2017, the Vigil of Pentecost, Bishop Bernard Fellay, Superior General of the Priestly Society of Saint Pius X, ordained five deacons at the Sacred Heart Seminary in Zaitzkofen.

The young Levites are all from different countries: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, and Russia. Our founder, Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre once said he saw it as a sign from God that young men filled with a true Catholic faith came from all four corners of the earth to join the Society.

Source

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Religious Order for Women with Down Syndrome

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

Here is a very inspiring article at Regina Magazine.  Here is an excerpt:

Little Sisters Disciples of the Lamb

Within this garden there is the small community of Little Sisters Disciples of the Lamb.  The existence of this Order, according to their Prioress is “to allow those who have the ‘last place’ in the world, to hold in the Church the exceptional place of spouses of Jesus Christ, and to allow those whose life is held in contempt to the extent of being in danger from a culture of death, to witness by their consecration to the Gospel of Life.”

The Little Sisters are made up of women with and without Down’s Syndrome. The Sisters follow the ‘Little Way’ of Saint Therese; their simple life is composed of prayer, work and sacrifice. Together the sisters work to teach their little disabled sisters the manual labor necessary for their development, which includes adoration and praying the rosary adapted to their rhythm and capacities.

Continue Reading...

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Join the Marian Sisters of Santa Rosa and Bishop Robert Vasa for a Barbeque on July 30, 2017

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Praying for Vocations Is NOT Optional

Friday, April 21, 2017

The Lord Jesus commands that we foster vocations, "Ask the master of the harvest to send out labourers for his harvest" (Mt 9:38).  Praying for priestly vocations is not optional.  This might be a revelation for many a good Catholic.  Praying for priestly vocations is not a matter of spiritual taste or preference.  Rather, praying for priestly vocations manifests our shared responsibility in obtaining from God the many "other Christs" - the priests needed chiefly for offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and for reconciling penitents, but also for evangelizing, for instructing converts, and for performing the countless works of education, culture, and charity granted by God to the world through His holy priesthood.

Source: FSSP's April 2017 Newsletter

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