Women Entering Religious Life Are More Conservative

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

The following article was published in the generally liberal New York Times newspaper.  The story is written by Mark Oppenheimer and was published on August 7th.

An excerpt:
Mechanical bulls, rock-climbing walls, bounce houses, go-karts: Before becoming a nun, Sister Virginia Joy helped insure them all.

“I was a go-between between the underwriters and the customers,” said Sister Virginia Joy, a former high school soccer star from South Carolina now wearing a habit of white and navy blue. She was fighting Midtown Manhattan traffic, late for a lunch with some other nuns. “I was overwhelmed by the Lord’s generosity in my life, and I wasn’t fulfilled in this job,” she said.

In 2009, at age 28 and then known as Virginia Cotter, she joined the Sisters of Life.

Young women joining religious orders have become increasingly rare over the years. The number of “women religious” in the United States is about 50,000, less than a third of that in 1966. According to a Georgetown University study, “there are more Catholic sisters in the United States over age 90 than under age 60.”

The younger nuns can be a surprising bunch. While many in the older generation moved to the left after the 1960s, in theology and politics — a trend that led in part to Pope Benedict XVI’s investigation of American nuns in 2012 — younger nuns tend to be more conservative. They want to wear the habit. While they work outside their communities, they have a strong focus on contemplative life, making time for hours of daily communal prayer. And they tend to have a strong sense of a particular mission...
 Photo Source: Andrew Sullivan for The New York Times

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Unacceptable comments include but are not limited to:

1. Posting Insulting, Derogatory, or Attacks against me or another commentor
2. Posting heretical or blasphemous comments
3. Posting obscene comments
4. Advertising or Self-Promotion (email such comments to me directly)
5. Writing a comment about something completely unrelated to the post you are commenting on
6. Linking to a video, article, webpage, etc. that I deem anti-Catholic or inappropriate
7. Posting a non-English Language comment. Use of Latin within is fine, but a message entirely in another language is not acceptable.

This policy is subject to change without notice.

Final decision rests with the author of this blog concerning the deletion of a comment.

Back to TOP